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Cognitive Behaviour Therapy as an Aid

By: Jack Claridge - Updated: 21 Aug 2012 | comments*Discuss
 
Fibromyalgia Pain Treatment Therapy

Many sufferers of conditions such as Fibromyalgia and M.E (Myalgic Encephalomyelitis) find that they experience periods of deep depression which is brought about by feelings of uselessness and being unable to be as physically active as they were before they were afflicted with the condition. These negative thoughts which do manifest themselves as anxiety, depression, stress and have physical side effects such as nausea and headaches can be overcome however using Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT).

What is Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT)?

Principally Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) is a psychological practice used to help individuals suffering from mental health issues. It is also used to help sufferers of phobias and is now being used as a means to help those suffering from debilitating illnesses such as Fibromyalgia and M.E (Myalgic Encephalomyelitis).

Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) is split into two sections – Cognitive being that of the mind and Behavioural which includes dealing with phobias head on by confronting them. For example if a phobic had a fear of spiders they might be – over a period of time encouraged to come into close contact with a spider in order to show that the spider is of no threat to them.

How Could Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) Help a Fibromyalgia Sufferer?

As we have already touched upon sufferers of both Fibromyalgia and M.E (Myalgic Encephalomyelitis) often find that they are plagued by anxiety and depression as a result of their inability to perform routine tasks as they did before they fell ill. This is very much the case if the individual was highly active both in their private lives and their career and can often render them unable to interact with others around them for fear of being considered worthless or treated as an invalid.

As much as these thoughts may be nothing more than the perception of the individual suffering from the condition they are strong enough to overwhelm even the strongest personality and that is where Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) can come into its own.

What Would Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Do for Me?

Given that you were susceptible to the treatment the idea is that through psychological and sometimes physical therapies you could overcome your fears and concerns about your condition and in essence learn to live with it from an emotional viewpoint. Therapists who practice Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) do so with the emphasis being on what is happening in your life at that time as opposed to your past. Therapists practicing Cognitive Behavioural Therapy aim to concentrate solely on the issues at hand as opposed to incidents that may have happened in your childhood or past relationships.

How Long Does Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Take?

It really depends on the individual and how deeply embedded the psychological problems are. It can take anything from eight weeks to twenty weeks with sessions ranging from one to two hours per week depending on the level of treatment you are undergoing.

Am I Required to Take Medication During This Time?

Very few psychologists can prescribe medications and those that do only do so in extreme circumstances. For the most part you will be required only to attend and want to overcome your problems and any medication prescribed to you will be under supervision from your doctor and may only be to help combat the physical pain associated with the condition from which you are suffering.

How Do I Go About Having Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT)?

This is something that your doctor may suggest to you especially if your mental state is being eroded by your physical condition. He or she may ask that you visit a psychologist for a consultation before any further arrangements are made but it should be noted that there is no shame or reason to feel embarrassed about undergoing such treatment. As always however it is best to consult your GP before contemplating any such therapies and discussing with them what they feel would be best for you.

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