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Bloating and Abdominal Problems

By: Jack Claridge - Updated: 30 Dec 2015 | comments*Discuss
 
Fibromyalgia Syndrome

Many of us at one time or another will experience discomfort in our lower intestine or abdomen caused by overeating or by an ailment that will eventually pass.

However there are many people who are unfortunate sufferers of such conditions on a more long term basis, some of them even plagued with such conditions all of their adult lives. And it is these conditions that we look at here.

What is Bloating?

Bloating is normally a pre-cursor to another ailment which will affect the sufferer; it is caused by gases produced by the stomach and intestines which find their way into the abdominal area - usually through the intestine and they will cause a painful and sometimes unsightly swelling of the lower stomach and abdomen.

Bloating as we have said is usually the first indication that something else is happening in that area and this bloating can lead to other more serious - or chronic - conditions if left unchecked. If you are experiencing bloating on an all too regular basis then it is a good idea to make an appointment to see your doctor.

What can Bloating be a Sign of?

As we have mentioned bloating can be a pre-cursor to another illness; sometimes an illness which may be acute or sometimes an condition that will last much longer and become chronic in its symptoms and appearance. Such conditions include :

  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome
  • Dysmotillity
  • Pre-menstrual Tension (PMT)

Of course all of these conditions are treatable in a variety of different ways and it is important when discussing them with your doctor than you make sure you are aware of the causes, the symptoms and the treatments that are available.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

Irritable Bowel Syndrome is a condition that is something of a dark horse; it would seem to be prevalent in individuals who suffer from conditions such as M.E and Fibromyalgia and would seem to rear its head as an overlapping condition.

Of course many individuals do suffer from Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) without any other condition be present and in these cases either an allergy to a food stuff or a highly stressful lifestyle are the key factors to look out for.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) can manifest itself in a number of different ways and is commonly associated with bloating of the stomach, constipation, and diarrhoea.

Dysmotillity

This condition is the heavy and bloated feeling a sufferer feels after eating; it is important to point out at this juncture that the size of meal is not important as the condition will cause bloating of the stomach and a feeling of nausea with any amount of food intake. Although not serious the condition can leave the sufferer feeling tired and listless as well as uncomfortable.

Another aspect of this condition would appear to be a hefty build up of gases within the stomach which are normally excreted by belching. Many individuals throughout the United Kingdom suffer this condition without actually realising it.

As with all ailments it is important to consult with your doctor if you think the symptoms are such that they have gone on too long. Your doctor will be happy to help and give advice on how to change your diet or steer clear of foodstuffs that may cause a build up of gases within the intestinal tract; likewise he or she will be happy to offer support and referrals if the conditions are perhaps more chronic in appearance.

It is important to remember however that when consulting with your GP you should give as much information and detail as you can, this will help them to make a more informed diagnosis.

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I have FM also suffer every day with all ailments mentioned. bloating is one can gain much weight gain when bloated up to 4to6 lbs . I need help !
Gracie - 30-Dec-15 @ 12:42 AM
Hi, my condition has not been diagnosed, been seen by onespecialists after another and nothing conclusive has been confirmed. I have pain and stiffness of joints and muscles. quite a lot of headaches. pelvic pain problems which trebles at night. swollen and painful joints mainly hands and fingers (trigger thumb). For the last few months I have been experiencing pain on the left upper quadrantof my abdomen which just recently doesn't go away. I get fed up with myself especially as I had to retire for medical reasons after being a nurse for over forty years and always been very active. Now i have to walk with a stick but not for long periods as it hurts my wrists and pain in my (r) side of my neck and shoulder. I suffer pain in myneck, all the way down my spine (my coccyx at present is really painful) knees,elbows and ankles. I have numbness in 3 toes in my left foot. The Drs say its arthritis- Rheumatoid and osteo but xrays have not confirmed thisI feel like i am being passed around from one Dr to another. Reading this web page makes me think I am on the right trackhas anyone else had the same story!
Maz - 7-Oct-13 @ 6:19 AM
I suffer with long bouts of bloatedness which push out my belly and make me look 6 months pregnant, which is not good for a man! I have also had major pain just under the bottom rib on the left side, but not far from the sternam 3 times now. I have had 2 endoscopys with nothing conclusive found, been diagnosed with a peptic ulser (not found on the 2nd endoscopy) and gastroenteritis yet 2 lots of strong antibiotics did nothing. I have FM and all of the usual ailments that go with it, but does anyone else suffer like this?
SparkyMark - 21-Jan-12 @ 10:31 PM
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